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Laurence Vallières

The Magic of Cardboard Sculptures - Laurence Vallieres in an Interview

January 31, 2017 - Elena Martinique

Sculpting animals such as monkeys, elephants and rhinoceroses, Laurence Vallières considers their human correspondents or the ideologies they represent. Imbued with humor, her visually stunning pieces captivate the viewer with their meaning, leaving them with something to contemplate about. Her work is heavily influenced by political philosophy and criticism. Drawing upon the writings of George Orwell and comics of Art Spiegelman, she believes the deft use of metaphor to critique a philosophy gives an artwork the feel of a widely-circulated inside joke. She maintains a fascination of urban development and street art, exploring the juxtaposition of an artwork in an unexpected environment and the reaction it creates.

How Cardboard Monkeys and Apes Became Stand-Ins for Us

October 6, 2015 - Chris Dart

"I guess putting a bit of humour in my art takes off a bit of the pressure I put on myself."

Laurence Vallières creates massive, often life-sized sculptures of animals out of recycled cardboard — sculptures that give off the distinct feeling that there's less difference between us and the rest of the animal kingdom than we'd like to think. Originally trained as a ceramic artist, Vallières says her move to cardboard was inspired, in part, by panic. "I had no place to show, so I rented this huge space, but then I got really worried it would look empty for the show," she says. "I freaked out and I said 'Oh, I need to make something really big in the middle.' I had ideas that were all over the place. I was going to buy a boat and paint that boat. Then one of my friends said 'Why don't you make one of your ceramics, but cardboard and big?'